Mental Health

Mental Health
Helping you to help yourself to maintain a healthy well-balanced body and mind is the core of the service we aim to provide at Bayswater Medical Centre.
There are times in everyone’s lives when you or someone close to you feels unable to cope well mentally with situations which are not usually a problem.
Difficult Times

Some times people are more vulnerable to mental ill health than others – these include:

  • Major Life Events – moving house, new job, marriage even if these are ‘good’ things.
  • Loss – such as death of close family or friend, job, relationship breakdown or children moving away from home.
  • Chronic Illness of any kind
More often than not you are able to ride through the rough patches by working it out or talking it through with close friends or family, and before long, you’re back on track.
However, there are times when this is not so simple: Those feelings of helplessness, anxiety or extreme fear/panic simply just not seem to be lifting.
Sometimes, behaviour may become strange or harming to yourself or others.
Coming to see any of the doctors or the practice nurse at that time may prevent the situation from turning into a disaster.
Remember:
  1. JUST TALKING IS NOT A WASTE OF TIME
  2. WE ARE NOT SIMPLY GOING TO PRESCRIBE DRUGS
  3. CHILDREN AND TEENAGERS MAY SUFFER MENTAL HEALTH PROBLEMS IF ANYONE IS HARMING YOU OR SOMEONE CLOSE TO YOU, COME AND TALK TO US FOR CONFIDENTIAL ADVICE IF YOU ARE WORRIED ABOUT THE BEHAVIOUR OF SOMEONE CLOSE TO YOU TALK TO YOUR GP/PRACTICE NURSE ABOUT IT IN CONFIDENCE
Services we offer:
General
We aim to tailor care according to need and have links with various support groups, counsellors, psychotherapists and psychiatrist.
Medication
Drug therapy may form part of a holistic management plan. We do not prescribe long-term medication which will lead to addiction.
Chronic Mental Health Management
Our clients with longstanding mental health problems may be managed by the GP or by a specialist or both.
Either way, we like to see all our clients at least yearly, to ensure that the services and/or medication you are receiving are appropriate to your needs, and that your generally health is being looked after.
Being on a Chronic Disease List helps us to ensure we are doing this well.
WHAT CAN YOU DO FOR YOURSELF?
Ultimately, your mental wellbeing will depend on what you are able to do for yourself.
Here are some tips which may help:
Exercise
It is well known and clinically proven that regular exercise helps to retain a healthy state of mind. Exercise programmes are commonly “prescribed” for depression and anxiety.
Diet
Poor diet often goes hand-in-hand with mental health problems. This may be eating too much, too little or eating erratically. Try to maintain a regular eating pattern as much as possible. Fish oils are know to improve mental stability.
Alcohol
A good “stiff drink” may initially seem like an effective quick fix but will very quickly start to make problems worse. Alcohol tends to enhance whatever mood you are in, so mild depression and anxiety will become severe by drinking alcohol. Try to avoid alcohol during difficult times.
Sleep Hygiene
Getting a good night’s rest may be difficult when stressed or suffering anxiety or depression. Regular use of sleep hygiene techniques have been found to work well:
The general idea is to get back into the habit of sleeping.
  1. Make the bedroom only for sleeping as far as possible. – So remove the TV, laptop, reading books and minifridge! (Sex in the bedroom is still OK).
  2. Avoid caffeinated drinks throughout the day (i.e. tea, coffee, fizzy drinks)
  3. Eat regular meals, but try not to eat after 8pm
  4. Exercise regularly, but not after 8pm
  5. Develop a “winding down” regime before going to bed – have a relaxing bath rather than a shower (if possible), and a warm milky drink.